Category: General

Guest blog by Professor Patrick Scott: ‘At Roslin Inn’

Guest blog by Professor Patrick Scott: ‘At Roslin Inn’ Burns editors face a special problem when a poem was not published by Burns himself and there is no manuscript in his hand. The problem...

Burns Documents at the NRO

Dr Carol Baraniuk (Research Associate at the Centre for Robert Burns Studies): Much of the current work of research staff on Burns C21 involves the transcription of manuscripts associated with Burns’s correspondence. It’s a...

Guest Blog by Professor Patrick Scott: Dr. John Mackenzie in the Irvine Miscellany

Guest Blog by Patrick Scott: Dr. John Mackenzie in the Irvine Miscellany Even among Burnsians who regularly handle the standard scholarly sources, few are fully aware just how often the standard sources are themselves...

Guest Blog by Professor Patrick Scott: ‘Scottish Bards and London Printers–Robert Burns, Gavin Turnbull’s ‘Epitaph on a Miser’, and Conjectural Emendation’

A recurrent issue in textual work on Scottish poetry is linguistic authenticity. Scottish literary texts, even in the author’s manuscript, can show considerable linguistic variety and eclecticism, but printers also vary widely in how...

Missing Flute Part for The Jolly Beggars – Can you help?

Hello everyone! It’s been a while since I last blogged on the project. We’ve been working hard, as Gerry McKeever’s blog on collations shows, on the detailed analysis of each song for the edition...

About Burns’s ‘To a Haggis’

This Burns Night, here are some of the things that interest our researchers about Burns’s famous poem, ‘To a Haggis’. Inspiration and Publishing History – Gerard Lee McKeever As is often the case with...

‘Editing Robert Burns for the 21st Century’ Research Contributes to Online Course – Robert Burns: Poems, Songs & Legacy – Launching 25 January 2016

Who was Robert Burns? What made him a poetic genius? And how did he become a global icon? These are just three of the questions that learners will explore as part of the first...

Robert Burns’s ‘Tam o’ Shanter’ – Happy Halloween!

This Halloween, we thought we’d share what interests us about Burns’s most famous and most eerie tale: ‘Tam o’ Shanter’.   Conception and Publication ‘Tam o’ Shanter’ was written at the suggestion of the...

The Transatlantic Voyage of Robert Burns’s Poetry

As part of the Scottish Graduate School For the Arts and Humanties incentive for researchers to ‘showcase’ their work to wider audiences through innovative and accesible means, I produced a short animation depicting some...

Crowdsourcing Burns – 1

The first instalment of our new ‘Crowdsourcing Burns’ blog features a lovely version of ‘Banks of Cree’ by Finn and Hanne Fahl. Finn and Hanne write that: “We are Danish not Scottish, and we live...